Vivian Mabuni‘s latest book Open Hands, Willing Heart: Discover the Joy of Saying Yes to God comes out today! A while back, I jumped at the chance to join her book launch team so I could get an advanced copy.

Get lots more book quotes and thoughts on my Instagram account and the hashtag #OpenHandsWillingHeart

I first learned about Vivian Mabuni when I stumbled across a video of her speaking at an international conference. I’d attended a local event telecasting that conference but they hadn’t shown her message. What a shame I almost missed hearing her speak. Not only did she challenge and encourage me spiritually, but it was memorable for me because it was the first time I’d ever seen an east asian woman breaking down God’s word and speaking in front of an audience of any size, let alone a worldwide audience. I got a bit emotional, folks. #representationmatters

ANYWAY, I immediately started following her online and that is how I learned about her upcoming book. Which is crazy timely for me. Because there are a lot of things God is asking me to say YES to and I know I am dragging my flat feet all about the hills and valleys.

So here we are. I’ve read the book and saved my favorite quotes. I’ve considered how I can convince the women’s group at my church to use this for our fall study. And there are some things I’ve learned I want to share with you all. Here goes.

Am I really willing?

The first section of the book introduces us to the story of Esther in the Old Testament. Christian ladies, you know it well. Although what you probably know is a very sanitized version that’s been presented as “a Biblical beauty pageant queen uses her position to convince the king to save her people”.

Vivian uses the story of Esther all throughout her book. A young girl, thrown into the extravagance of the Persian empire ruled by a dangerously volatile king , forsaking her Jewish heritage and breaking several commandments from Mosaic law just to survive.

But, as we know, she risked execution for the chance to change the fate of her people who were scheduled for genocide. In fasting and prayer, she turned from self-preservation, back toward the God of the Jews, and let God use her.

As the author, Vivian, re-introduces us to Esther in this book it struck me how differently I understand this story now as an adult. And what new things I learn about God here.

Am I willing to give-up my tendency toward self-preservation? Because, like Esther, a lot of my struggles to raise my voice against injustice or to “lay down my life” have to do with self-preservation. It is so much easier to go along with the culture around me. Sometimes I feel like it’s all I can do to just survive. Is my heart really willing to say YES to what God asks me to do, fighting my survival instinct and loosening my grip on all my plans, preferences and priorities?

What gets in the way?

The second section of the book tackles our common roadblocks head on; apathy & entitlement, self-reliance, busyness and bitterness. There was a lot of good prompts for self-evaluation in these 4 chapters and it’s hard to pick one thing to zero in on.

I’ll zero in a bit on the chapter on apathy and entitlement. Having a willing heart to do God’s work means we cannot have a calloused heart towards the PEOPLE God wants us to show His love too. We western Christians, myself included, tend to view ourselves as super charitable, truly loving all of God’s people, and yet if we’re honest, most of us function daily in very insular communities and spaces.

It’s easy for us think our hearts are willing for God to use us wherever, but then believe He just “hasn’t given us a heart for those people.” When really, that’s not the full picture. Really, we tend to have a “I’m a good enough person” kind of spiritual apathy and a Christian cultural that tends to focus more on what we know about or get from God than an actual, life-altering relationship with Him.

The grip of apathy and entitlement gets loosened by challenging our perceptions through proximity, humility, and generosity.”

Vivian Mabuni, Open Hands Willing Heart

Opening our hearts and hands to God means making the resources He has given us available for Him to use for others.

Living It Out

The last 6 chapters dive deeper into various aspects of living an open-handed life. This is section of the book is, for me, the most important and valuable. It would lend itself to some amazing conversation for group study.

Vivian touches on difficult topics like removing idols, forgiveness, dying to self. She shares examples from the lives of people she knows to illustrate her points. I won’t say more about it, though. I will let you get the book and read it for yourself.

“There is no greater love than this; to lay down one’s life for one’s friend.” – John 15:13
I sold these tee’s to help fundraise for my cousin’s living liver transplant.

Grab A Copy!

I would recommend this book for all Christ followers, men and women. While you may find some of the themes in this book familiar to ones you’ve read in other Christian living titles, Vivian Mabuni brings a fresh and valuable perspective that, to me, makes these matters of faith so much more applicable today.

I highly encourage purchasing books if you can afford it as it is the best way to support authors. Start by asking your local bookstore to carry the book. That way you can support a local business and the Vivian at the same time.

However, if buying isn’t an option for you right now, there are other supportive things you can do like request that your local library get a copy.

Where to buy online:

5 Day Reading Plan

I just found out there is also a free 5 day reading plan with excerpts from the book and additional scripture and reflection questions. This is a great way for readers to sample content of the book.

Read other book reviews I’ve written!

1 Comment

  1. Jamie Lapeyrolerie

    2019-07-12 at 10:01 AM

    Yay! So glad you were encouraged by Vivian’s book. I loved it too!

    Reply

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